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Jewish Ghetto

Jewish Ghetto

9.433 reviews
Sights and Museums, Other, Neighborhood
Ranked #28 in Rome things to do
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  • 9.8
    History Buffs
  • 9.5
    Foodies
  • 6.2
    Family Travelers
  • 5.8
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Rome, Italy
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Find the Jewish Ghetto right beside the Tiber in Rome, and experience another side of the Eternal City. In 1555, Pope Paul IV issued an edict requiring the Jews of the city to live in a constrained ... Read more
district in the city's worst area, and then he walled them in. This ghetto remained in function officially until Italian unification in the late 19th century. Today, however, the walls are torn down and the district is full of light and tourists. The area's food is particularly lauded; try the carciofi alla giudia, or Jewish artichokes. Fried to simple perfection with olive oil, salt and pepper, this traditional dish is like Roman Jewish comfort food.

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Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Really stunning area to walk around. Gorgeous architecture and countless photo ops (bring your camera). There are plenty of books outlining the history of the area; read those before your visit for a new outlook on what you're seeing. Foodies, this is THE place for Rome's famous artichokes. If it's artichoke season, head here and feast on them. Most of the restaurants in this part of the city serve them and they're all delicious.

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Rome’s Jewish community dates back to the 2nd century BC, making it one of the oldest in Europe. At one point there were as many as 13 synagogues in the city but Titus’s defeat of Jewish rebels in Jerusalem in AD 70 changed the status of Rome’s Jews from citizen to slave. Confinement to the Ghetto came in 1555 when Pope Paul IV ushered in a period of official intolerance that lasted, on and off, until the 20th century. Ironically, though, confinement meant that Jewish cultural and religious identity survived intact.

Recommended for:Family TravelersFoodiesHistory Buffs
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Local from Mentana, Italy

Loose yourself along the little streets, look at the variety of little shops far from the industry. You will find the real artisan and the real and very good Roman cooking in the many restaurants around. But stop at the bakery to tate the delicious cakes of the Jewish tradition mixed with the Roman tradition

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Local from Anzio, Italy

the famous jewish ghetto full of supergood restaurants. it is about 15 minutes walking, go to see the square with the fountain of turtlas and the ancient roman temple

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Tallahassee, Florida

A stroll through the Jewish Ghetto in Rome does not seem like it would be horrible now to be walled up and locked into this space, but today's ghetto looks nothing like the crowded, waterless community that imprisoned Rome's Jewish population for 315 years. From 1555 until 1870, what is now a popular destination for lunch and foodie tours, used to house a population with no running water, that was not allowed to leave after dark, and who were forced to attend Catholic sermons each week on the Jewish Sabbath. After the ghetto walls were torn down and some blue sky returned by leveling a lot of the crowded, unsafe and unsanitary buildings, the Jewish community that remained is now in one of the most chic parts of Rome. Centrally located, apartments now regularly sell at well over a million dollars each. Think Lower East Side, New York revitalization, Rome style. Nice walk.

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Savannah, Georgia, USA

Historically speaking, it deserves a visit.

Near a Vestal Virgin historical spot. Best Jewish artichokes (flattened and fried) served near original gate to Roman wall in area.

Recommended for:History BuffsOutdoor EnthusiastsSpiritual SeekersStudents
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Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA

The entrance to the Jewish Ghetto is just off Ponte delle Guglie, at the beginning of the Strada Nuova. As you get off the bridge, turn immediately left and then immediately right under the arches which says Sotoportego del Ghetto Vecchio, which once upon a time used to be a gate marking the boundary of the ancient Jewish Ghetto, the area from which the Jews weren’t allowed to come out. As you walk through a small dark alley you will walk straight into the Ghetto. Notice how tall the buildings are. This is the only area of Venice where buildings go up to 7-8 floors. This is due to the fact that Jewish people were allowed to live only in a restricted area and so they had to devise a way to build houses which could host all of the community. Carry on walking until Campo del Ghetto Novo where, near the Scuola Grande Tedesca, there is the Museum of the Jewish Ghetto. The museum stands in the main campo of the Ghetto and it’s an astonishing pretty small museum which houses many memories of history of the Jewish community of Venice. You can also organize a tour of the synagogues (which in Venice are called Scuole), a very very interesting tour.

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Calgary, Canada

A visit to the Jewish Ghetto is necessary to find restaurants serving the best Carciofi alla Giudea, but also take a tour that explains the history of the area--one of the first ghettoes in Europe.

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The Ghetto: ancient Jewish Quarter. Great attraction. Many specialized restaurants.

Recommended for:History Buffs
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San Francisco, California, USA
Ambassador

Whether you're looking for great architecture or unique cuisine, a stop in the Jewish Ghetto is a must. It's less packed with tourists as the Centro to the north, but there's plenty to see. Restaurants combine Italian dishes with Jewish flair, and it's the most ideal stop if you're looking for something kosher.

Recommended for:FoodiesHistory Buffs
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Saratoga
First to Review

We loved strolling through the Jewish Ghetto while in Rome. Yes, that's what it's officially called, and it's a term embraced by the residents. Ironically, it's becoming a more upscale part of Rome. Some great Kosher Roman restaurants here, some bistros, and the museum in the Temple here is worth a visit.

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Pietra Ligure, Italy

Try one of te tasty restaurant which make fried food

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Sant'Anatolia di Narco, Italy
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Miravet, Spain
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Sorso, Italy
Recommended for:History Buffs
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Local from Rome, Italy
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Jewish Ghetto

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