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Coronavirus Travel Advice

NEW: Alaska and New Mexico have ended testing and quarantine requirements. In Vermont, vaccinated travelers are exempt from quarantine. Frontier Airlines extended its policy for waiving change and cancel fees for new bookings. Delta is blocking middle seats through April 30, 2021.

Coronavirus travel update

Information is changing every day which can make it hard to keep up with the facts that are most relevant to you.  

We’re continually keeping this page up to date with the latest information and travel advice regarding the current outbreak of coronavirus disease, also known as COVID-19. So whether you need it now or in the near future, it could be worth a bookmark.

We strongly recommend reading the coronavirus travel advice from your local authorities and governments — such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Department of State — as well as the guidance from the World Health Organization (WHO), a reliable and trusted source of global news and information.

Government coronavirus travel advice

Now in effect, the CDC’s implementation of an executive order requires “the wearing of masks by all travelers into, within, or out of the United States, e.g., on airplanes, ships, ferries, trains, subways, buses, taxis, and ride-shares. The mask requirement also applies to travelers in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and seaports; train, bus, and subway stations; and any other areas that provide transportation.”

If you travel domestically, review travel restrictions at both the state and local levels. Some states don’t have state-wide requirements, but some counties and cities are imposing rules and restrictions.

Also, be aware that each state has varying restrictions and guidelines around the types of businesses that can be open. For a complete list of the types of businesses open in each state, click the links we share below at the state level or visit the New York Times’ comprehensive state-by-state guidelines page.

Coronavirus travel restrictions by state

Note that although there may not be statewide restrictions, some counties and cities are enforcing their own. Be sure to check the local government website of your destination.

Alabama: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Alabama.

Alaska: Out-of-state travelers and returning residents should submit a Travel Declaration and Self-Isolation Plan and are strongly encouraged to submit a negative result from a test taken prior to departure to Alaska or get tested at the airport. It’s recommended that anyone awaiting test results self-quarantine. Get details on the latest advisory or comprehensive Alaska travel information.

Arizona: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Arizona.

Arkansas: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Arkansas.

California: All those arriving from outside the state (including returning residents) are encouraged to self-quarantine for 10 days after arrival in California. Los Angeles, San Francisco and Santa Clara counties have a mandatory, 10-day quarantine for those entering from outside their region. LA is requiring all those arriving from outside the state (ages 16+) to submit out an online travel form prior to arrival. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine up to $500. For more details, click here.

Colorado: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Colorado.

Connecticut: Anyone traveling into Connecticut from outside the U.S. or anywhere other than New York, New Jersey or Rhode Island is directed to self-quarantine for 10 days from the time of leaving the identified state or country. It is necessary to fill out a travel form. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine up to $500 for each violation. Quarantine can be shortened or eliminated with proof of negative test results taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival in the state. For more information, click here.

Delaware: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Delaware.

District of Columbia: Visitors must get tested with 72 hours of entering DC. Those who plan to be in DC for longer than three days should get tested within 3-5 days of their arrival. Exceptions include essential workers, those traveling for less than 24 hours, visitors from Maryland and Virginia, among others.

Florida: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Florida.

Georgia: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Georgia.

Hawaii: All transpacific and intercounty travelers arriving on Kauai will be subject to the 10-day quarantine regardless of testing. For residents and visitors traveling to all other Hawaiian islands, it is required to upload a negative test result prior to departure (before boarding the final leg of their trip). If not, they must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arrival, even if they receive a negative test result after arrival. Only test results from pre-approved partners are being accepted. Completion of the state’s Safe Travels form is mandatory for all individuals. Wearing a face mask in Hawaii is required by law. For more information, click here.

Intercounty travelers can participate in Hawaii’s Safe Travels program and be exempt from the 10-day travel quarantine with a negative COVID-19 test taken less than 72 hours before intercounty travel. On Kauai, “resort bubble” hotels will allow travelers to use resort amenities for the first 3 days of their trip until they are able to take a post-arrival COVID test. A negative test result will allow them to leave the “resort bubble.”

Idaho: There are no statewide travel restrictions for visitors to Idaho.

Illinois: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to the state of Illinois, but the city of Chicago is requiring visitors from particular states to self-quarantine for 10 days. Its system places states in three categories – red, orange and yellow – with differing travel advisories and restrictions/requirements.

Indiana: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Indiana.

Iowa: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Iowa.

Kansas: Residents and visitors who meet one of the following criteria must quarantine upon entering or returning to Kansas: Individuals who have attended an out-of-state mass gathering event of 500+ people where others were not wearing masks and practicing social distancing; returning from a cruise ship or river cruise; and/or were notified by public health officials as being a close contact of someone with a case of COVID-19. Length of quarantine varies. For information, click here.

Kentucky: Those who travel out of state so are asked to self-quarantine for 14 days upon return to Kentucky (or follow CDC quarantine guidance). For more information, click here.

Louisiana: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Louisiana.

Maine: Individuals traveling to Maine must self-quarantine for 10 days (or the length of their trip if it’s shorter) or provide proof of a negative test result. Visitors and residents from New Hampshire and Vermont are exempt from the quarantine requirement. For more information on quarantine guidelines, click here.

Maryland: Out-of-state travelers and returning residents must obtain a negative COVID-19 test result or quarantine for 10 days. This does not apply to those traveling to or from Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington D.C. Maryland residents are required to limit nonessential travel. For more details, click here.

Massachusetts: Most travelers and returning residents are required fill out a travel form and self-quarantine for 10 days upon entering the state or produce a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of arrival. Those who don’t quarantine are subject to a $500 fine per day. Travelers from states classified as lower-risk are exempt from the test or quarantine requirements.

Michigan: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Michigan.

Minnesota: Visitors and residents returning from out of state are asked to quarantine for 14 days. For more information, click here.

Mississippi: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Mississippi.

Missouri: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Missouri.

Montana: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Montana, but Native American reservations throughout the state have put their own restrictions in place. To learn more, click here.

Nebraska: There are no travel restrictions for domestic visitors to Nebraska. Those arriving from abroad are required to get tested 3-5 days after travel and self-quarantine for 7 days after travel.

Nevada: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Nevada.

New Hampshire: Individuals traveling to New Hampshire, including returning residents, are asked to self-quarantine for 10 days unless they are coming from the following states: Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island. There is a 7-day quarantine “test out” option for travelers. For more information on quarantine guidelines, click here.

New Jersey: Travelers and returning residents coming from anywhere beyond New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Delaware are asked to fill out a travel form and self-quarantine (length of quarantine varies depending on circumstances). The state says it’s voluntary but compliance is expected.

New Mexico: It is strongly advised for visitors and returning residents to self-quarantine for 14 days and get a COVID-19 test upon entering the state. For more information, click here.

New York: To test out of the mandatory 10-day quarantine, visitors and returning residents must take a COVID-19 within three days of arriving in New York, then quarantine for three days and get retested on the fourth day. If the test from the fourth day is negative, they can exit quarantine. Those exempt include essential workers and individuals from states that border New York. Covered travelers still must fill out the Traveler Health Form. NOTE: Requirements are different depending on whether you were out of state for less than or more than 24 hours. For more information, click here.

North Carolina: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to North Carolina.

North Dakota: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to North Dakota.

Ohio: All individuals traveling to Ohio from states reporting positive coronavirus testing rates of 15% or higher are asked to self-quarantine for 14 days. The list of affected states is updated weekly. For more information, click here.

Oklahoma: Visitors to Oklahoma coming from from “an area with substantial community spread” must wear a mask in all public spaces and limit attendance at indoor gatherings for 10-14 days. For more information, click here.

Oregon: All returning residents and visitors traveling for non-essential purposes are asked to self-quarantine for 14 days after arrival in Oregon. Masks are required in all public indoor and outdoor spaces. Other measures are based on county-by-county risk levels. For more information, click here.

Pennsylvania: Out-of-state travelers and returning residents over age 11 must either have a negative COVID-19 test, quarantine for 10 days without testing or do a 7-day quarantine with a negative test on or after day 5 of quarantine. To read about exemptions and other details, click here.

Rhode Island: Those traveling to the state from outside the US or a state with restrictions must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arrival. Travelers from within the US may provide proof of a negative test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to avoid quarantine. Those coming from abroad can shorten quarantine to 7 days by testing negative at least 5 days after arrival. Complete this certificate of compliance and travel screening form upon arrival in Rhode Island. Visitors may need to provide these documents to accommodations at check-in. For more information, click here.

South Carolina: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to South Carolina. Those who have traveled in the last 14 days are asked to stay home as much as possible.

South Dakota: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to South Dakota.

Tennessee: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Tennessee.

Texas: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Texas.

Utah: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Utah.

Vermont: Returning residents and travelers must abide by a mandatory 14-day quarantine. It is possible to test out of quarantine with a negative result on or after day 7 of quarantine. Gatherings between multiple households is not allowed, therefore travelers cannot stay with a local host. For more information on gathering restrictions and other cross-state information, click here. Note: those who have been vaccinated are exempt from quarantine in Vermont, but at least 14 days must have passed since receiving the final vaccine dose.

Virginia: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Virginia.

Washington: A governor-issued travel advisory recommends a 14-day quarantine for interstate and international travelers. Anyone who has recently been in the UK, South Africa or other countries where a new variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has been circulating must quarantine for 14 days. For more information, click here.

West Virginia: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to West Virginia.

Wisconsin: There are no statewide travel restrictions for visitors to Wisconsin. The state recommends that Wisconsinites cancel or postpone all travel, including within the state. Several Wisconsin counties issued travel advisories for seasonal and second homeowners. If you must travel, check for area-specific safety updates and closures. You may need to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival at your destination. For more information, click here.

Wyoming: There are no travel restrictions for visitors to Wyoming.

Coronavirus travel restrictions by country

Visit Skyscanner’s global map for the latest information on where U.S. citizens and residents can travel to from the Unites States.

A policy that began January 26, 2021 requires all air passengers traveling from a foreign country to the U.S. to present a negative COVID test prior to boarding their flight to the United States. The test must have been taken within 3 days of the flight, regardless of vaccination status, and travelers must present written documentation of the results or proof of having recovered from COVID-19 within the last three months (and not currently experiencing symptoms). Read all about COVID-19 PCR tests in our comprehensive overview.

Foreign nationals who have been in one of the below countries in the last 14 days cannot enter the United States. According to the CDC: “citizens and lawful permanent residents of the United States, certain family members, and other individuals who meet specified exceptions, who have been in one of the countries listed [below] in the past 14 days will be allowed to enter the United States.”

  • China
  • Iran
  • European Schengen area (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican City)
  • United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland)
  • Republic of Ireland
  • Brazil
  • South Africa (as of January 30, 2021)

For country-specific travel advice, visit the CDC or State Department websites.

Coronavirus flight cancellation and policy updates

American Airlines

Updated Flight Schedule

  • The carrier is operating a reduced domestic and international flight schedule due to decreased demand and coronavirus travel restrictions.
  • American Airlines is collaborating with domestic and foreign governments to offer preflight COVID-19 testing for individuals traveling to specific destinations.

Change and Cancellation Policy

  • American Airlines is eliminating all change fees for First, Business, Premium Economy and Main Cabin (except Basic Economy fares) tickets for all domestic and short-haul international flying (including Mexico, Canada, Caribbean, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) for tickets issued on or after August 31, 2020. If your travel plans change, you can keep the full value of your original ticket but will need to pay the fare difference if your new flight is more expensive. If your new flight is less expensive, you’ll get the fare difference in the form of travel credit to use on a future trip. The new change fee policy applies to AAdvantage® award tickets as well.
  • Change fees have also been eliminated for First, Business, Premium Economy and Main Cabin tickets for all long-haul international flights originating in North or South America. This if valid for tickets issued on or after November 19, 2020.
  • For new tickets booked until March 31, 2021, American Airlines is expanding their offer to waive change fees for all dates, regardless of fare type or itinerary. This offer includes Basic Economy fares and AAdvantage® award tickets.
  • For more information or to change or cancel an American Airlines flight, click here.

Frontier

Updated Flight Schedule

  • The pandemic has impacted domestic and international flight options. To discover all current Frontier flights from the United States, click here.

Change and Cancellation Policy

  • There are no change and cancellation fees for bookings made through March 31, 2021. Terms and conditions apply.
  • Frontier’s general change and cancellation policy is: $0 for 60+ days prior to departure; $39 for 59 to 7 days prior to departure; and $59 for 6 or less days prior to departure (including same day). Changes are subject to fare difference. There are other details to note about changed/cancelled tickets.
  • For additional information on changing or cancelling existing Frontier reservations, click here.

Delta

Updated Flight Schedule

  • The pandemic has impacted domestic and international flight options.
  • Delta announced that it is blocking middle seats through at least April 30, 2021. It has also added hand sanitizer stations to its aircrafts, and more. Read the details here.

Change and Cancellation Policy

  • Delta is broadly waiving change fees, including any flights purchased before April 17, 2020, departing through March 2021 and all tickets purchased through March 30, 2021.
  • Tickets purchased between March 1, 2020 – March 30, 2021, can be changed without a change fee for up to a year from the original date of purchase. Difference in fare price will apply.
  • Change fees will not apply to tickets purchased in 2021 for travel originating from North America to anywhere in the world (excluding Basic Economy fares). Fare difference will still apply.
  • For more information on rescheduling or cancelling Delta flights, click here.

Spirit

Updated Flight Schedule

  • Spirit has adjusted its domestic and international flight schedule due to the impact of coronavirus. To check their updated schedule, see upcoming nonstop services and view seasonal routes, click here.

Change and Cancellation Policy

  • Spirit is waiving change and cancellation fees for individuals whose travel plans are impacted by COVID-19.
  • For those looking to cancel their flights, Spirit is providing a reservation credit and allowing individuals to rebook within 12 months (though the flight itself can take place after that time frame).
  • For more information on changing or cancelling a Spirit flight, please click here.

Turkish Airlines

Updated Flight Schedule

  • Due to the impact of coronavirus, Turkish Airlines has updated its domestic and international flight schedules.
  • For more information on current flights, click here.

Change and Cancellation Policy

United

Updated Flight Schedule

  • The pandemic has impacted domestic and international flight options. For the most up-to-date flight schedule, visit United’s page here.
  • The airline has permanently eliminated change fees for most Economy and premium cabin tickets for flights within the U.S.

Change and Cancellation Policy

  • For tickets issued March 3-March 31, 2020, change fees are waived for a flight of equal or lesser value for travel up to 24 months from the original ticket issue date.
  • For tickets issued between April 1, 2020-March 31, 2021, change fees are waived for a flight of equal or lesser value for travel up to 12 months from the original ticket issue date.
  • To change or cancel your United flight, click here.  

Have you been impacted by coronavirus flight cancellations? Get more useful advice in our article on what to do if your flight is cancelled or delayed. Plus, find out how to book flexible travel, from airfare to accommodations.

Coronavirus frequently asked questions

While this is a fast-developing situation, here are four coronavirus travel need-to-knows:

How can I stay safe when traveling?

There are a lot of practical steps you can take. Regularly wash your hands (with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand gel), avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth and stay at least three feet away from someone who is coughing or sneezing. Read more from the WHO.

I want to cancel my travel plans due to coronavirus. How do I do this and can I get a refund?

First of all, call the airline, hotel, or online travel agent who you booked with. Not sure which company you used? You’ll see their name on your bank or credit card statement as well as the email you received from them to confirm the booking.

My flight has been canceled due to coronavirus. How do I get a refund?

Call the airline or online travel agent you booked with if your flight is cancelled. With so many travel plans changed, it may take longer than usual to speak to someone who can help, but keep trying. If the airline or online travel agent tells you that a refund isn’t available or they’ve stopped trading, it might be worth getting in touch with your credit card company if that’s how you booked. If you have travel insurance, get in touch with the provider as well.

Will my travel insurance cover coronavirus flight cancellations?

It all depends on your travel insurance policy as to whether flight cancellations are covered. Check your provider’s website or give them a call to find out more about your specific situation.

Find answers to commonly asked questions about COVID-19 from the WHO. We have also responded to the top questions from our traveler community in a comprehensive Q&A.

This page was last updated on February 26, 2021. To our knowledge, the information on this page was correct at the time of publication. However, given the nature of the COVID-19 crisis, information will vary by location and change at short notice and over time. We will do our best to keep this page up-to-date, however this cannot be guaranteed.  

This page has been created for general guidance only and has not been designed for you or any specific circumstances relevant to you. It is highly recommended that you check your government’s latest travel advice before traveling or making any decisions to travel.